City, DOJ agree to changes for reviewing incidents involving use of force | KOB 4

City, DOJ agree to changes for reviewing incidents involving use of force

Brittany Costello
March 10, 2018 06:52 PM

ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. – The road to reform continues to be a work in progress for the Albuquerque Police Department years after the court-approved settlement agreement.


The sixth report card from the Department of Justice, issued at the end of 2017, strongly criticized APD leadership, stating the oversight of use and show of force had passed the point of "critical failure."

But in court documents filed Monday, the city, police union and DOJ officials agreed on new modifications for policies regarding use of force by officers. It starts with a three-level use of force classification system.

Level one is for low-level force, level two deals with intermediate force and level three is for serious force. The modifications clarify how each type of force investigation should be handled.

Level one uses of force will first be reviewed by a supervisor, while special investigative units will handle level two and level three cases.

Those investigations will then go through a chain of command, from the Force Investigation Section to the Performance Review Unit and finally the Force Review Board.

The document reads that the three-tier system will provide sustainability and consistency that is needed at the police department. The Albuquerque Police Officers Association submitted a statement in that court filling which read, in part, "a change in classification is necessary to improve overall operations."

The independent monitor said the proposed changes clearly identify responsibilities for when it comes to use of force situations.



Brittany Costello

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