Advertisement

Google search turns up missing pieces of grandfather's vast military service

Kassi Nelson
December 31, 2017 10:16 PM

ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. – For the Martinez sisters, the last day of 2017 was all about reflection and honoring their father, Eliu Martinez.

Advertisement

He served in the Army Special Forces, including the elite Green Berets. He’s a World War II, Korean War and Vietnam Veteran. He has stories, but he’s kept most of them to himself.

“I thought nobody would care about my service because I don’t like to talk about it,” Martinez said.

But Sunday morning was different after the daughters were able to reunite Eliu with pieces of his uniform. His granddaughter, curious about her grandpa’s military past, decided to do a Google search.

She found more than she expected when his military shirt popped up on eBay.

“I felt like this was the Christmas miracle and that my father deserved this for what he has done,” Dee Martinez said.

Though faded, the shirt has “Martinez” still stamped on the inside along with the last four digits of his serial number. There were also photos in the pocket and card with the code of conduct for military personnel going to Vietnam.

They had gone missing during a move from Panama to Vietnam in 1967, not seen by Eliu Martinez for half a century.

“To me, I think it’s a great honor for my own children to do this for me, and I didn’t realize that because I never ever really told them anything about the Special Forces,” he said.

It was a special moment for the family, and a way for the sisters to say "Thank you" for their dad’s courage and sacrifice. 

Credits

Kassi Nelson

Copyright 2017 KOB-TV LLC, a Hubbard Broadcasting Company. All rights reserved

Advertisement


Relay Media Amp

Advertisement


Advertisement




Weather-related crashes reported in northern NM; at least two killed

Severe driving conditions in northern New Mexico

Kids, teens head to the Roundhouse focused on education, health

Small plane crashes near Santa Fe, pilot taken to hospital

House speaker: Fixing Albuquerque's crime crisis benefits state