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With clerk jailed, gay Kentucky couple gets marriage license

MOREHEAD, Ky. (AP) — A gay couple emerged from a Kentucky county clerk's office with a marriage license in hand Friday morning, embracing and crying as the defiant clerk who runs the office remained jailed for her refusal to issue the licenses because she opposed same-sex marriage. William Smith Jr. and James Yates, a couple for nearly a decade, were the first to receive a marriage license Friday morning in Rowan County. Deputy clerk Brian Mason issued the license, congratulating the couple and shaking their hands as he smiled. After they paid the license fee of $35.50, James Yates rushed across the steps of the courthouse to hug his mom as both cried.


US employers added 173K jobs in Aug.; rate falls to 5.1 pct.

WASHINGTON (AP) — The U.S. unemployment rate fell to a seven-year low in August as employers added a modest 173,000 jobs, a key piece of evidence for the Federal Reserve in deciding whether to raise interest rates from record lows later this month. The Labor Department said Friday that the jobless rate fell to 5.1 percent — a level consistent with a normal economy and the lowest since April 2008 — from 5.3 percent in July.


10 Things to Know for Today

Your daily look at late-breaking news, upcoming events and the stories that will be talked about today: 1. KENTUCKY CLERK'S JAILING PAVES WAY FOR GAY MARRIAGE LICENSES


Drowned Syrian boys buried in hometown they fled

KUCUK KENDIRLI, Turkey (AP) — A Syrian woman and her two young sons who drowned on a desperate voyage from Turkey to Greece were buried Friday in their hometown of Kobani, returning to the conflict-torn Syrian Kurdish region they had fled. With the burial of his family, Abdullah Kurdi abandoned any thought of leaving his homeland again.


Frustrated refugees begin walking to Austria from Budapest

BUDAPEST, Hungary (AP) — Hundreds of refugees who have been stuck for days at Budapest's Keleti train station gathered their belongings and began marching out of the city, vowing to make it to Austria on foot after Hungarian authorities blocked them from boarding Western-bound trains. They carried their belongings in bags and backpacks as they snaked through Budapest in a line stretching nearly a half-mile long, hampering traffic at times, as they began the 171-kilometer journey (106-mile) to the Austrian border. By mid-afternoon they had reached the M1 motorway on the outskirts of the city.


Benghazi panel to interview more of Clinton's inner circle

WASHINGTON (AP) — The chairman of a congressional panel investigating the deadly Benghazi attacks says a member of Hillary Rodham Clinton's inner circle could provide key insight into how the State Department maintained its presence in Libya prior to the 2012 attack. Jake Sullivan, a former policy director and deputy chief of staff at the State Department, arrived early Friday for what is expected to be a daylong session.


Philly businesses wary, excited by prospect of papal crowds

PHILADELPHIA (AP) — Business owners in Philadelphia could enjoy a financial windfall from the crowds expected for the papal visit — if their employees can get to work through the security perimeters and road closures. To encourage shops to navigate the hurdles and stay open for the historic occasion, the city this week launched the hashtag (hash)OpenInPHL. Officials also began distributing marketing kits with buttons and signs saying "Welcome Pope Francis" and "I'll Be There."


Fired regulator: Brown pushed to waive oil safeguards.

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — California's top oil and gas regulators repeatedly warned Gov. Jerry Brown's senior aides in 2011 that the governor's orders to override key safeguards in granting oil industry permits would violate state and federal laws protecting the state's groundwater from contamination, one of the former officials has testified. Brown fired the regulators on Nov. 3, 2011, one day after what the fired official says was a final order from the governor to bypass safety provisions of the federal Safe Drinking Water Act in granting permits to oil companies for oilfield injection wells. Brown later boasted publicly that the dismissals led to a speed-up of oilfield permitting.


More heartbreak for Ebola survivor after baby boy dies

FREETOWN, Sierra Leone (AP) — It was the new beginning that Sierra Leone's first Ebola survivor, Victoria Yillia, had yearned for after losing 21 of her relatives to the disease: a newborn who would allow her and her husband to start a new family. But only weeks after the baby they named Barnabas was born, he died of an infection that overwhelmed his tiny body. In the Ebola-ravaged community of Kenema, the baby who already had become a symbol of rebirth and renewal was buried on Thursday, a day after he died.


Players hoping "Deflategate" can usher in change

PITTSBURGH (AP) — Tom Brady is free and Ramon Foster can't help but laugh. Sorry, the irony is just a little too delicious. The Pittsburgh Steelers' guard remembers joining the rest of his teammates in declining to ratify the new collective bargaining agreement between the owners and the NFL Players Association in the summer of 2011 because of concerns it gave Commissioner Roger Goodell too much authority.










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