U.S. & World News


International charity's Afghan clinic bombed, 9 staff dead

KABUL, Afghanistan (AP) — Nine local staffers for Doctors Without Borders were killed and 30 were missing after an explosion near their hospital in the northern Afghan city of Kunduz that may have been caused by a U.S. airstrike. In a statement, the international charity said the "sustained bombing" took place at 2:10 a.m. (2140 GMT). Afghan forces backed by U.S. airstrikes have been fighting to dislodge Taliban insurgents who overran Kunduz on Monday.

Russia launches new wave of air raids in Syria

DAMASCUS, Syria (AP) — Russian warplanes have attacked the Islamic State group and other insurgents in central and northern Syria with a wave of new airstrikes, Syrian and Russian military officials said Saturday. Russian military spokesman Maj.-Gen. Igor Konashenkov said the warplanes flew 20 missions in Syria over the past day, hitting nine IS targets. He said an IS command post and a weapons storage bunker were destroyed in the area of Raqqa, the extremists' de facto capital.

More rain, flooding forecast along soggy East Coast

Even with Hurricane Joaquin no longer as big of a threat, the weekend promises little relief for the most waterlogged parts of the East Coast. The National Weather Service says flooding remains a concern through Monday morning, especially in parts of North and South Carolina that already have received up to 11 inches of rain this week. Forecasters say some areas could see storm totals as high as 15 inches.

Oregon shooting victims: Teens just starting out, teacher

PORTLAND, Ore. (AP) — The nine people killed after a gunman opened fire on an Oregon community college campus Thursday took different paths to the small rural college, ranging from teens starting college for the first time to adults who were seeking a second career. One was an assistant professor of English at the college. The worst mass shooting in Oregon history also injured several others at Umpqua Community College in Roseburg, Oregon. The gunman died following a shootout with police. Some family members took to social media early after news of the shooting broke, expressing concern that they hadn't yet heard from relatives. Many used that same platform to express their heartbreak once their worst fears were confirmed.

House Republicans still searching for new leadership

WASHINGTON (AP) — House Republican turmoil is boiling over as leadership elections approach, with dissatisfied lawmakers casting about for new choices and a surprise longshot challenger emerging in the speaker's race. The upheaval reflects a caucus ever more divided in the week since House Speaker John Boehner stunned Capitol Hill by resigning under conservative pressure. And it comes as a long list of weighty and polarizing issues loom on Congress' agenda, including raising the federal borrowing limit to avoid a market-shattering default, and paying the bills to keep the government running.

Fiorina makes distortion of Planned Parenthood a centerpiece

GREENVILLE, S.C. (AP) — Republican presidential hopeful Carly Fiorina has spent the last two weeks repeating an erroneous description of videos secretly recorded by anti-abortion activists. That seems bound to continue as she makes her opposition to Planned Parenthood a centerpiece of her 2016 campaign. Campaigning in South Carolina on Friday, Fiorina said she "absolutely" stands by her criticism of Planned Parenthood. She accused the women's health organization — it's also the nation's largest abortion provider — of pushing "propaganda" against her while being "aided and abetted by the media."

Vatican fires gay priest on eve of synod

VATICAN CITY (AP) — The Vatican on Saturday fired a monsignor who came out as gay on the eve of a big meeting of the world's bishops to discuss church outreach to gays, divorcees and more traditional Catholic families. Monsignor Kryzstof Charamsa was a mid-level official in the Vatican's doctrine office. In newspaper interviews published in Italy and Poland on Saturday, Charamsa said he was happy and proud to be a gay priest, and was in love with a man whom he identified as his boyfriend.

1965 Immigration Act, presented as symbolic, changed nation

NEW YORK (AP) — It was considered a symbolic move — President Lyndon Johnson going to the Statue of Liberty and signing an immigration bill that gave people from every country in the world an equal chance to come to America. The president himself described the legislation as less than revolutionary. "It does not affect the lives of millions. It will not reshape the structure of our daily lives, or really add importantly to either our wealth or our power," he said during the ceremony on Oct. 3, 1965.

Germany marks 25 years of unity, facing new challenges

BERLIN (AP) — Germany marks a quarter-century as a reunited nation on Saturday, with two leaders from the formerly communist east heading a country that increasingly asserts itself as Europe's political heavyweight — and now faces a new challenge in a refugee influx that will demand deep reserves of resourcefulness and patience. West and East Germany united on Oct. 3, 1990, capping a process that started less than 11 months earlier when the east's communist leadership opened the Berlin Wall under pressure from massive demonstrations. Evening out the differences between east and west has been a far slower process, and some inequalities persist even now.

Louisville investigating if escorts were hired for recruits

A book by an escort alleging that former Louisville staffer Andre McGee brought escorts into dorm parties, and paid for the women to strip and have sex with the Cardinals' recruits, their fathers and players is available online. Louisville is investigating allegations by Katina Powell in the upcoming book, "Breaking Cardinal Rules: Basketball and the Escort Queen," from a publishing affiliate of the Indianapolis Business Journal. The 104-page book was available early Saturday, but some details were published on the Journal's web site on Friday.