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U.S. & World News


NEWS BRIEFS


Israel bombards Gaza as it searches for soldier

GAZA CITY, Gaza Strip (AP) — Israel bombarded the southern Gaza town of Rafah on Saturday as troops searched for an officer they believe was captured by Hamas in an ambush that shattered a humanitarian cease-fire and set the stage for a major escalation of the 26-day-old war. The Israeli military has said it believes the soldier was grabbed in a Hamas ambush about an hour after an internationally brokered cease-fire took effect Friday morning. The Hamas military wing on Saturday distanced itself from the soldier's alleged capture, which has prompted widespread international condemnation. President Barack Obama, U.N. chief Ban Ki-moon and others have called for his immediate and unconditional release.


Why isn't there a treatment or vaccine for Ebola?

LONDON (AP) — In the four decades since the Ebola virus was first identified in Africa, treatment hasn't changed much. There are no licensed drugs or vaccines for the deadly disease. Some are being developed, but none have been rigorously tested in humans. One experimental treatment, though, was tried this week in an American aid worker sick with Ebola, according to the U.S-based group that she works for in Liberia.


US aid workers headed to Atlanta for Ebola care

NEW YORK (AP) — When two U.S. aid workers infected with Ebola arrive in Atlanta from Africa, they will be whisked into one of the most sophisticated hospital isolation units in the country. The specialized unit at Emory University Hospital was opened a dozen years ago to care for federal health workers exposed to some of the world's most dangerous germs.


Car parts plant blast in China kills 65, hurts 100

BEIJING (AP) — Sixty-five people were killed and dozens seriously burned Saturday by an explosion at an eastern Chinese automotive parts factory that says it supplies General Motors, state media reported. The blast at the factory in an industrial zone of the city of Kunshan also left more than 100 people injured, with many suffering severe burns, the official Xinhua News Agency said. Kunshan, in Jiangsu province, is about 1,000 kilometers (600 miles) southeast of Beijing. Authorities have taken away two company executives


Push for charges in NYC police chokehold death

NEW YORK (AP) — New Yorkers enraged by a man's death in police custody see a medical examiner's ruling that blames a prohibited chokehold as a clear indication the officers involved should face criminal charges. "They killed somebody," neighbor Charlene Thomas said after the city's medical examiner deemed Eric Garner's death a homicide. "Why? Because they're cops, they gotta get away with this?"


Obama has room to maneuver on immigration changes

WASHINGTON (AP) — What can President Barack Obama actually do without Congress to change U.S. immigration policies? A lot, it turns out. There are some limits under federal law, and anything the White House ultimately decides to do may be challenged in court as unconstitutional. But leading legal experts say the White House almost certainly could delay indefinitely efforts to deport millions of immigrants already in the U.S. illegally, and it could give them official work permits that would allow them to legally find jobs, obtain driver's licenses and pay income taxes.


Kentucky politics gets a side order of barbecue

MAYFIELD, Ky. (AP) — The annual picnic at Fancy Farm always serves up a main dish of politics along with a side of delicious barbecue. And this year voters will get a rare glimpse of Kentucky's U.S. Senate candidates standing side by side as they face armies of hecklers trying to move them off their talking points. Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell and his Democratic challenger, Alison Lundergan Grimes, will share the same stage for only the second time. One of the most-watched races in the country, it could weigh heavily on which party controls the Senate for the final two years of President Barack Obama's term.


Justice delayed is pondered in Cambodia

PHNOM PENH, Cambodia (AP) — A U.N.-assisted genocide tribunal will deliver a verdict this coming Thursday in the trial of the two top leaders of the communist Khmer Rouge, whose extremist policies in the late 1970s are blamed for the deaths of an estimated 1.7 million Cambodians though starvation, medical neglect, overwork and execution. Khieu Samphan, 83, the regime's head of state, and Nuon Chea, 88, right-hand man of the group's late leader, Pol Pot, were tried for crimes against humanity. They will face a second trial this year on additional charges of genocide. The tribunal's first trial sent to prison the commander of the group's notorious Tuol Sleng torture center, but the upcoming verdict will mark the first time the Khmer Rouge policymakers will be judged.


2 Americans detained in North Korea seek US help

PYONGYANG, North Korea (AP) — Two American tourists charged with "anti-state" crimes in North Korea said Friday they expect to be tried soon and pleaded for help from the U.S. government to secure their release from what they say could be long prison terms. In their first appearance since being detained more than three months ago, Matthew Todd Miller and Jeffrey Edward Fowle told a local AP Television News crew that they were in good health and were being treated well. They also said they were allowed to take daily walks. The brief meeting was conducted under the condition that the specific location not be disclosed.


Obama says after 9-11, US 'tortured some folks'

WASHINGTON (AP) — The United States tortured al Qaida detainees captured after the 9/11 attacks, President Obama said Friday, in some of his most expansive comments to date about a controversial set of CIA practices that he banned after taking office. "We tortured some folks," Obama said at a televised news conference at the White House. "We did some things that were contrary to our values."










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