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Congressional candidate with history of stalking charges accused again

Kassi Nelson
October 31, 2017 07:26 PM

ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. -- A New Mexico politician is in hot water after police say he sent a woman several text messages Saturday night that caused her to fear for her safety.

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David Alcon hopes to snag the Second Congressional District seat in southern New Mexico, but now he faces stalking accusations. According to a criminal complaint, the victim was at a Halloween party Saturday at the Courtyard Marriott when her phone began to light up.

It was Alcon, reportedly telling her he loved her and he wasn’t going to lose her again for another 10 years. He also allegedly said he wanted her to have children with him, suggested he was watching her, and sent her a picture of his genitals.

The victim left the party and her Uber driver called the police. That’s when Alcon said he was at her apartment, which prompted a search by an officer. Alcon wasn’t there.

Police said Alcon has done this before. In 2008, he pleaded guilty to aggravated stalking and criminal trespassing. Those charges were dismissed after he completed probation.

In this most recent, the victim told police she met Alcon at a political party about a decade ago and that he had texted her in the past, but nothing to the extent of this weekend.

When Alcon announced his decision to run for Congress last month, he told the Santa Fe New Mexican that those charges are in the past and he’s had to deal with mental health issues. KOB reached out to Alcon for comment, but he didn’t answer that request. 

Credits

Kassi Nelson

Copyright 2017 KOB-TV LLC, a Hubbard Broadcasting Company. All rights reserved

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