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Roswell police recruit arrested for sexting teens, RPD says

KOB.com Web Staff
November 20, 2017 10:11 PM

ROSWELL, N.M. -- Investigators are asking for any other potential victims to come forward after a police recruit was arrested for soliciting children.

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Roswell police say 25-year-old Alonso Barrientos is accused of sexting at least two teenage boys. He's been charged with two counts of child solicitation by communication devices.

Barrientos was training to become an officer after working as a Roswell police service aide for two and a half years. He was fired after his arrest.

"I am disgusted with this recruit's behavior. I want to assure the Roswell community this criminal act was addressed immediately," Roswell Police Chief Philip Smith said in a statement. "The recruit was removed from service and the criminal investigation was initiated."

A middle school teacher first reported the accusations to police on Nov. 2. When police investigated that claim, they learned of a second alleged victim. Both boys received texts messages and images from Barrientos' personal cell phone, according to police.

Investigators believe Barrientos told the second teen he was 17 years old.

"It matters not who the individual is. The Roswell Police Department holds all accountable and those who are employed by the Roswell Police Department are held to the highest levels of accountability," Smith said. "The scales of justice are blind and fair, and the Roswell Police Department’s standard is to always seek fair and unbiased justice as we serve and protect our community.”

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KOB.com Web Staff

Copyright 2017 KOB-TV LLC, a Hubbard Broadcasting Company. All rights reserved

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