Advertisement

Storm flattens trees in Santa Fe National Forest

Eddie Garcia
May 11, 2017 05:25 PM

ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. -- The vantage point from Chopper 4 shows the result of nature's raw power. The Santa Fe National Forest reports a massive tree blow-down on Windsor Trail near Stewart Lake.

Advertisement

According to witness reports, the damage was found shortly after May 5. Still, the forest service says that down trees pose a major hazard. Even standing trees in the area could be damaged and susceptible to collapse.

The damage was most likely not caused by a tornado. From the looks of it, this result could be from a dry microburst.

Exactly how does a dry microburst work? In many cases, dry thunderstorms will actually evaporate the rain before it hits the ground. This causes the air to become cold, dense and heavy and it comes rushing to the ground.

That's a likely culprit for the tree-flattening we saw in the Santa Fe National Forest.

Microbursts happen all the time in New Mexico, during severe weather season and throughout the monsoon. The damage can be devastating, even destroying structures and overturning vehicles.

Credits

Eddie Garcia

Copyright 2017 KOB-TV LLC, a Hubbard Broadcasting Company. All rights reserved

Advertisement


Advertisement

Advertisement


Advertisement


Like Us on Facebook Follow Us on Twitter Follow Us on LinkedIn Follow Us on Google+ RSS Email Newsletters Android Apps iOS Apps



#abq4ward: New risk assessment tool designed to set bond more fairly

Victoria Martens' grandparents file civil lawsuit against APD

Santolina development project inches ahead despite water concerns

New Mexico revises outlook for state government income

Group that helped ban lunch shaming to hold fundraiser