ABQ Business First: Extended public health order continues to strain businesses | KOB 4
Advertisement

ABQ Business First: Extended public health order continues to strain businesses

Patrick Hayes
Created: August 04, 2020 06:38 PM

ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. —KOB 4 caught up with Albuquerque Business First Editor-In-Chief Rachel Sams to discuss how businesses are reacting to the public health order extension.

"So definitely that is a long time for businesses,” Sams said. “Many of which have been shut down or limited in capacity for months now."

Advertisement

The public health order is now set to expire at the end of August. Sams said the announcement has sparked even more worry in the business community.

"Thinking about that for another month is definitely difficult and daunting and some businesses are really struggling to figure out if they can make it,” she said.

Under the new indoor, indoor restaurant dining is still prohibited. New changes include allowing wineries and distilleries to open for outdoor seating.

Meanwhile, the number of those filing for unemployment in New Mexico continues to rise.

"We are seeing almost 100,000 New Mexicans that are continuing to certify for unemployment benefits last week.  That is the highest it's been and it's three times the previous peak in the number of people certifying for unemployment and that came in the last recession in 2009,” Sams said.

Sams said the state has extended a work search waiver due to an increase in coronavirus infections.

Many New Mexicans will now be without an extra $600 a week after federal coronavirus benefits expired at the end of last month. The impact that will have on the state’s economy remains to be seen.


Copyright 2020 - KOB-TV LLC, A Hubbard Broadcasting Company

Comment on Facebook
Advertisement

Advertisement

Advertisement


New Mexico state government braces for financial pain

Questions raised over Trump bumper sticker spotted on county vehicle

Trump to far-right extremists: 'Stand back and stand by'

New Mexico man facing life in prison in hostage taking case

Tax relief aimed at New Mexico's drought-stricken ranchers