Agora Crisis Center pushes to lower suicide stats in New Mexico | KOB 4
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Agora Crisis Center pushes to lower suicide stats in New Mexico

Hawker Vanguard
December 04, 2018 06:31 PM

ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. – As suicide statistics continue to rise across the county, a crisis center in Albuquerque is trying to drive those numbers down.

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The Agora Crisis Center was founded in 1970 after the suicide death of a UNM student.

Professors and students created a place to be heard no matter what time of day or how big the problem.

People like Peter Leyba answer calls every week. He’s one of more than a hundred volunteers that have a personal connection to helping people in distress.

“When I was in high school I didn’t feel like I could open up. And then when I found out about Agora it was something that really resonated with me and I wanted to be a part of it,” Leyba said.

Clinical Director, Molly McCoy-Brack said Agora is ready to hear from all sorts of people with any kind of problem.

“They’ve lost their job, they're struggling with an illness. So we get calls from a wide variety of people,” McCoy-Brack said. “Everything under the sun and some of our calls are those people that are thinking about suicide.”

Leyba said he’s ready to handle anything.

“There’s not necessarily a wrong thing to say as long as you're coming from a place of compassion and understanding,” Leyba said.

Click here for more information on the Agora Crisis Center. The hotline is 24/7 and can be reached at 855-505-4505.

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Hawker Vanguard

Copyright 2018 KOB-TV LLC, a Hubbard Broadcasting Company. All rights reserved

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