APD adds more homicide detectives | KOB 4
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APD adds more homicide detectives

Ryan Laughlin
Updated: November 18, 2019 12:15 PM
Created: November 17, 2019 10:27 PM

ALBUQUERQUE, N.M.— The city of Albuquerque is two murders away from tying its deadliest year ever.

In 2017, Albuquerque broke a record with 72 homicides.

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Mayor Keller has since doubled the number of homicide detectives from five to 10 when he took office. He is now planning to add one more.

Some families who have had loved ones murdered said APD is still understaffed.

"I’m talking to my case officer. They are so short staffed and there's only so many hours in a day and people don't realize how much work goes into this,” Carl Campos said.

Campos is still waiting for justice for his daughter Cayla who was shot and killed near Bianchetti Park while playing Pokémon Go last month. 

APD officials said they have investigated 70 homicide cases this year. Out of those 70 cases, 36 have been solved.

In 2018, APD investigated 69 homicides and solved 37—just over half.

APD told KOB 4 that it is less about the number of detectives and more about good witnesses willing to testify.

U.S. Attorney General William Barr expressed similar sentiments about witness intimidation during his visit to Albuquerque last week.

"I think one of the basic problems is the failure to provide pretrial detention of dangerous offenders,” Barr said. “That has the effect of not only allowing the offender back on the street where they can commit more crimes, but it also intimidates the neighborhood and prevents people from coming forward because they feel these people will be right back out on the streets."

APD spokesperson Gilbert Gallegos said APD is doing everything they can to bring justice to families.

“Our homicide detectives work large caseloads, often under intense public scrutiny. Make no mistake, they put everything into solving these cases and bringing justice to every victim and their loved ones,” he said.


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