New Mexico eases quarantine requirements for travelers from lower-risk states | KOB 4
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New Mexico eases quarantine requirements for travelers from lower-risk states

Christina Rodriguez, Megan Abundis
Updated: September 03, 2020 10:13 PM
Created: September 03, 2020 12:12 PM

ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. — Gov. Michelle Lujan Grisham issued a revised executive order Thursday, amending the mandatory quarantine requirements for some travelers arriving into New Mexico. 

Individuals arriving from states with a 5% positivity rate or greater, or a new case rate greater than 80 per 1 million residents, must quarantine for at least 14 days from their date of entry into New Mexico.

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As of Sept. 2, those high-risk states and territories include: 

  • Alabama, Alaska, Arizona, Arkansas, California, Delaware, Florida, Georgia, Hawaii, Idaho, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maryland, Minnesota, Mississippi, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, Nevada, North Carolina, North Dakota, Ohio, Oklahoma, Puerto Rico, Rhode Island, South Carolina, South Dakota, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, Virginia, West Virginia and Wisconsin. The quarantine requirement also applies to individuals arriving into New Mexico from outside the United States.

As of Sept. 2, those low-risk states include: 

  • Colorado, Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts, Michigan, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Vermont, Washington, Wyoming

Individuals arriving from states with a 5% positivity rate or lower, or a new case rate lower than 80 per 1 million residents, are advised to get tested for COVID-19 within 5 to 7 days of their arrival in New Mexico. Those individuals are advised to consider self-isolation, but the quarantine requirement no longer applies to visitors and residents arriving from lower-risk states. 

All of the COVID-19 positivity rates mentioned above will be calculated over a 7-day rolling average. 

Individuals who can show documentation of a valid negative COVID-19 test taken within the 72 hours before or after entry into New Mexico are exempt from the 14-day quarantine requirement, regardless of the state from which they have traveled. However, this exemption does not apply to persons entering the state after traveling outside the U.S. 

“In order to strike a balance between public health and ensuring New Mexicans can live and move safely in a COVID-positive world until the arrival of an effective and widely available vaccine, we have to make tough, strategic and data-driven decisions,” Gov. Lujan Grisham said. “As I have said, we have to maintain the necessary precautions to keep the people of New Mexico safe while identifying areas where we can amend restrictions to address our state’s economic crisis. Without a coherent federal plan, we are on our own, and it is up to New Mexicans to keep making the right decisions every day to protect themselves, their families and our state.”

In addition to the amended quarantine requirements, places of lodging that have been safe-certified may expand their maximum occupancy from 50% to 75%. 

The list of states where the quarantine order still applies will be updated on the New Mexico Department of Health website. The revised executive order can be found here. The order will go into effect Sept. 4. 

FAQs

What if a green state moves into the red while you are there?
     Public health officials say anyone entering the state must abide by the restricted states regardless of day-to-day fluctuations.

How will this be enforced?
      Just like the rest of the public health order, people who are found in non-compliance could be subject to involuntary quarantine by the New Mexico Department of Health and a fine.


 


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