Social media privacy settings could help keep kids safe | KOB 4
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Social media privacy settings could help keep kids safe

Social media privacy settings could help keep kids safe

Casey Torres
June 11, 2019 05:28 PM

ALBUQUERQUE, NM— School is out and that means more time for children to spend outdoors or online and if they have social media, bullies and strangers can follow them outside of the classroom.

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Here are some simple ways parents can change privacy settings on social media:

Facebook:

  • Log in on a desktop.
  • Click the drop down arrow in the top right corner.
  • Click on settings.
  • Select blocking to block emails, messages, event invitations and more.

Instagram:

  • Log into the app.
  • Click on the user icon in the top left of the screen.
  • Go to settings.
  • Click on privacy - From here you can choose to have a private account.

Snapchat:

  • Log into app.
  • Click on the circle or Bitmoji in the top left corner.
  • Click on the gear symbol in the top right corner. From there you can choose who can contact your child and who can see their story posts.
  • You can also click on "Ghost Mode" if you want to disable the app from showing your child’s location.

Since these are simple settings for those who are not tech savvy, children might be able to disable the changes.

Talk to your child about the importance of safety that comes with keeping privacy settings turned on. Some social media apps may also have terms and conditions giving only the user the ability to change settings.

Credits

Casey Torres

Copyright 2019 KOB-TV LLC, a Hubbard Broadcasting Company. All rights reserved

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