Uptick in Parvo cases has vets warning puppy owners | KOB 4
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Uptick in Parvo cases has vets warning puppy owners

Casey Torres
May 13, 2019 07:58 AM

ALBUQUERQUE, N.M.-- Veterinarians at the Rio Bravo Veterinary Hospital are seeing an uptick in Parvo Virus cases.

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On Friday, a Pitbull puppy named Holly was hooked up to an IV while being held in the arms of Debbie Perea.

The vet tech said the pup is a rescue that's been fighting Parvo for a week.

"She's stolen my heart," said Perea as she consoled Holly.

Perea said Holly is only one of about a dozen puppies that have been taken to the hospital infected with the virus in the past few weeks.

It’s a contagious disease that usually attacks puppies younger than two years. It's spread by feces and targets a dog’s intestines.

There’s no cure for it, so dogs have to fight through it.

Holly isn’t in good shape, but hospital staff is hopeful she will make it.

The first signs of infection are lethargy and lack of appetite.

"They'll probably start vomiting, and then they may or may not start having diarrhea. It may or may not be bloody but, you do need to get them to the vet as soon as possible,” said Perea.

The virus can survive in the ground for years after making contact, so unvaccinated pups can catch it while at the park. That’s why Perea is urging owners to vaccinate puppies between 6 to 8 weeks.

She said that’s the only way a dog can be kept safe from the nasty virus that hopefully Holly will beat.

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Casey Torres

Copyright 2019 KOB-TV LLC, a Hubbard Broadcasting Company. All rights reserved

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