AM Prep-Kickers

ROSWELL, NEW MEXICO TO HOST ANOTHER FESTIVAL FOR UFO-PHILES NEXT SPRING

ROSWELL, N.M. (AP) — Roswell, New Mexico — known for its association with extraterrestrial matters — will have two big UFO-themed events next year. The Roswell Daily Record reported Tuesday that the city has negotiated to host the second annual UFOXPO in the spring. The three-day event was previously held in Florida. The extraterrestrial extravaganza includes a film festival, cosplay, panels on UFOs and live music. It will be held March 10-12. This is on top of the city’s UFO Festival every summer. Roswell officials hope the UFOXPO can be another flagship event that draws visitors during spring break season. Ideally, the festivals will complement each other. The events may not draw little green men, but it’s hoped the economic impact will top the $2 million generated last year.

TWO ALABAMA WOMEN CONVICTED OF FEEDING, TRAPPING STRAY CATS

WETUMPKA, Ala. (AP) — Two Alabama women have been convicted of misdemeanor crimes because they fed and trapped stray cats. Wetumpka Municipal Judge Jeff Courtney found 85-year-old Beverly Roberts guilty of criminal trespassing and disorderly conduct. And 61-year-old Mary Alston was found guilty of criminal trespassing and interfering with governmental operations. Both women to 2 years of unsupervised probation and 10 days in jail. The jail sentence was suspended, meaning the women will serve no time. Each woman was also fined $100 and ordered to pay court costs. The women were arrested in Wetumpka in June. The police chief said they had been warned repeatedly not to feed strays. A lawyer says they were performing a public service by spaying and neutering the animals.

GOLD RUSH TREASURES FROM 1857 SHIPWRECK UP FOR AUCTION

RENO, Nev. (AP) — Since the recovery of sunken treasure began decades ago from an 1857 shipwreck off the coast of South Carolina, tens of millions of dollars worth of gold has been sold. But scientists, historians and collectors say that the real fortunes will begin to hit the auction block on Saturday. For the first time, hundreds of Gold Rush-era artifacts entombed in the wreckage of the S.S. Central America will go on public sale. Known as the “Ship of Gold,” the steamship sank on Sept. 12, 1857, in a hurricane on its way from Panama to New York City. Most of the passengers boarded the S.S. Central America in Panama after traveling from San Francisco on another ship and taking the train across the isthmus. Some 425 lives were lost and 153 people were rescued. For more than a century, many of their possessions — some still sealed in safes and passenger trunks — were preserved in the chilly, oxygen-deprived gravesite 7,200 feet under the surface of the Atlantic Ocean. A few pieces described as priceless rarities could fetch as much as $1 million at Saturday’s public auction in Reno

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