Heart Hospital surgeons working on 'cutting-edge' procedure | KOB 4
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Heart Hospital surgeons working on 'cutting-edge' procedure

Casey Torres
April 16, 2019 07:18 AM

ALBUQUERQUE, N.M.-- A team of surgeons at the Heart Hospital of New Mexico at Lovelace Medical Center are working on what they call a cutting-edge surgery.

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The percutaneous bypass or PQ Bypass is still in global clinical trials, but the first procedure happened at the center.

The PQ Bypass is a non-invasive surgery that helps people suffering from peripheral arterial disease (PAD).

Dr. Steve Henao, a vascular surgeon, said PAD is bad blood flow or blockage in the legs that can be caused by diabetes, smoking, obesity or other illnesses.

Dr. Henao said most patients with PAD have no symptoms, so it's a silent disease that lingers in the background.

"But it can lead to crippling leg pain that doesn't allow you to walk and in some instances can lead to pain even at rest or a wound, or Gangrene," said Dr. Henao.

He said the procedure can take about two hours and doesn't require general anesthesia.

"What this new technology allows us to do is to do a bypass, but from an entirely different area that involves tiny little nicks in the skin, so that the patients have literally no recovery time," explained Dr. Henao.

Other surgeries involve a big cut that increases the chances of infections, so Dr. Henao said the PQ Bypass is a game changer.

Since it is a clinical trial, Dr. Henao said it can take a few to several years before it becomes widespread.

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Casey Torres

Copyright 2019 KOB-TV LLC, a Hubbard Broadcasting Company. All rights reserved

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