'Affirmative consent' may be taught in NM schools | KOB 4
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'Affirmative consent' may be taught in NM schools

Kai Porter
February 08, 2019 09:30 PM

SANTA FE, N.M. - HB 133 would require public or private schools and colleges that receive state or federal funding to teach students about something called "affirmative consent." 

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Eighth grade students at the Santa Fe Girls' School spent their morning at the Roundhouse on Friday. They were voicing their support for HB 133 which requires students to learn about affirmative consent. 

"Affirmative consent is the notion that yes means yes. Not just that no means no, but that before anything happens, both parties have to give a verbal yes," student Ellie Wechsler said.

The students testified in the bill's first committee hearing, explaining why they want lawmakers to pass the bill. 

"I think if we can manage to teach all of the kids affirmative consent then I think the possibilities of sexual assaults will go down," student Amelie Romero said. 

Rep. Liz Thomson, D-Albuquerque, sponsored the bill and says students would start learning about affirmative consent in the eighth grade as part of their health education courses. 

"We think it's an important thing to protect particularly young women, but also young men, in that there's no confusion. If she didn't say yes then it's not yes. Period. It's not kind of ambiguous," Thomson said. 

The bill unanimously passed its first and only committee in the House today. Next is the floor vote.

Track this bill during the legislative session

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Kai Porter

Copyright 2019 KOB-TV LLC, a Hubbard Broadcasting Company. All rights reserved

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