Animas River at record low, but residents staying optimistic | KOB 4
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Animas River at record low, but residents staying optimistic

Meg Hilling
April 10, 2018 10:02 PM

AZTEC, N.M. - Scientists say the Animas River is at the lowest level in years. Despite that news, some in the Four Corners remain optimistic about the river's outlook.

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Scientists and residents are attributing the low water level to the lack of snow seen over the winter, but that isn't stopping some business owners from making the most of the river.

"We've been rafting here for almost 30 years, and we see years like this a lot," said Alex Mickel, owner of Mild to Wild Rafting and Jeep Tours. "And they can be really great times to get on the river, especially for families and people who aren't looking for that high water experience,"

Rafting companies aren't the only ones trying to be optimistic about the water level in the Animas River. Further downstream, farmers in the region are also trying to be optimistic.

"I am an eternal optimist and if you worry about things that don't happen, you are wasting your time worrying," Aztec Farmer Mike Carruthers said. "If you worry about them and they do happen, you are still acting your time worrying."

For Carruthers' alfalfa farm, the low water flow means relying on the water irrigation system him and his neighbors' use.

"That's the way you got to live life. You can't get too far down the road and you can't live in the past," he said. "Like I say, you've got to be an optimist."

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Meg Hilling

Copyright 2018 KOB-TV LLC, a Hubbard Broadcasting Company. All rights reserved

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