City of Santa Fe asks feds for help after facing massive budget shortfall | KOB 4
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City of Santa Fe asks feds for help after facing massive budget shortfall

Nathan O'Neal
Created: May 19, 2020 06:19 PM

ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. — In New Mexico’s capital city, the coronavirus has devastated the local economy.

“The city of Santa Fe is facing a $100 million budget deficit on all of our funds, about a $30 million on our general fund,” said Santa Fe Mayor Alan Webber.

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Mayor Webber said city leadership is working to evaluate possible cost-cutting measures.

“This is what a health emergency provokes,” the mayor said. “It goes from a health emergency to a fiscal emergency.”

This comes weeks after Santa Fe faced protests after the city approved furloughs for city employees to bridge the fiscal gap for the current budget.

“We are asking the federal government to help us. We need support from the feds in order to deal with this crisis,” Webber said.

On Capitol Hill, the HEROES Act was recently approved by the House.

“Standing up for local governments should not be partisan,” said New Mexico Rep. Ben Ray Lujan in a phone interview.

The bill is backed by Assistant Speaker Lujan and includes nearly $375 billion for local government aid.

“The House of Representatives took bold action for the American people and now it's time for President Trump and Senate Republicans to join us in this effort because supporting local state and tribal governments is the right thing to do,” he added.

The HEROES Act was passed along party lines in the House last week and has since been stalled in the Senate.


 


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