Fire marshal stresses importance of controlled burn permits | KOB 4
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Fire marshal stresses importance of controlled burn permits

Casey Torres
April 26, 2018 07:01 PM

ROSWELL, N.M. – Fire crews expect to be busy with the current dry conditions, but they urge residents to help them out if they plan on conducting a controlled burn.

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Matt Miller, the fire marshal for the Roswell Fire Department, said burn permits are required but not a lot of residents seem to know about it. When someone sees a fire or smoke, they call the fire department and crews rush to the scene.

"Driving to an incident is a huge safety risk. It puts the firemen at risk and people on the streets," Miller said.

Some of the fires turn out to be controlled burns without a permit. Miller said when residents are issued a permit, firefighters will know what they're responding to and where without using too many resources.

Miller said the process for requesting and being issued a permit is helpful, free and easy. The first step is making a phone call to any fire station in the City of Roswell.

After the call, they will look into the area and determine if it is safe to burn. If it is, the permit will be issued and the resident can start the fire.

The important part of the process, Miller said, is the fire department notifies the dispatch center about the controlled burn. They are given the address and the estimated time of the burning, so if someone sees the smoke or fire and makes a phone call, fire crews will know how to respond.

Credits

Casey Torres

Copyright 2018 KOB-TV LLC, a Hubbard Broadcasting Company. All rights reserved

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