Eddy County moves back to five-day work week | KOB 4
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Eddy County moves back to five-day work week

Faith Egbuonu
February 18, 2019 08:42 PM

EDDY COUNTY, N.M.-  Two years ago, Eddy County commissioners implemented a four-day work schedule for the county, but that's about to change.

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Eddy County officials voted 3-2 to bring back the five day work week last month.

Ernie Carlson, the District 1 County Commissioner, who voted for the five-day work schedule, said people frequently told him about the negative impact a four-day work week had on them.

He said many of them told him that it had a negative impact on their businesses, especially in estate.

"They would try to take off on a Friday so, they can get the closing statements and everything done on a Friday, so they can move on a Saturday or Sunday, so they can be back to their jobs on a Monday. Well, that couldn't happen with a four-day work week," Carlson said.

KOB 4 reached out to District 5 Commissioner, Susan Crockett, who voted against moving back to a five day work week, but she chose not to comment.

District 3's, Larry Wood also voted against the switch.

Carlson says he is sensitive to the needs of the county employees, but he believes the community comes first.

"Every government's number one mission Is service to the community, the citizens and the businesses within that community," Carlson said.

The five-day work week will go into effect Feb. 24. 

Credits

Faith Egbuonu

Copyright 2019 KOB-TV LLC, a Hubbard Broadcasting Company. All rights reserved

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