Gov. Lujan Grisham details numerous plans to deal with COVID-19 crisis | KOB 4
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Gov. Lujan Grisham details numerous plans to deal with COVID-19 crisis

Brittany Costello
Updated: April 03, 2020 10:33 PM
Created: April 03, 2020 09:09 PM

ALBUQUERQUE, N.M.- Gov. Michelle Lujan Grisham reminded New Mexicans that they should stay home over the weekend.

"The second you let up, it's an invitation to this virus to present itself," she said during a briefing Friday. "It's insidious."

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As the state approaches 500 positive cases of COVID-19, the governor said she would extend her health orders, which limit business in the state, to April 30. And she said she isn't afraid to do more to keep New Mexicans safe.

"We're going to do metering. What does that mean? It means we've got a formula that we'll announce Monday that says, for example, in big box stores, for example, you can only have this many employees and you can only have this percentage in the store at any time, based on what your fire marshal capacity is," the governor said.

As state leaders work to limit interactions between people, they are also preparing for the future. 

The governor said the state needs thousands of additional hospital beds, ICU beds and ventilators, especially during the peak, which is expected in mid-April to early May.

"So we absolutely now reviewed and selected now, with the Army Corps of Engineers, the old Lovelace, Gibson hospital site," Gov. Lujan Grisham said. 

They also plan on setting up additional hospital facilities at Miyamura High School in Gallup.

The governor said she's also working to make sure health care workers have the supplies they need. However, she admitted that it's become a difficult task.

"In a lot of ways, this is a hospital gown that you would wear over the clothing. It can be discarded after you come into contact with a patient, seems simple enough. Where these were a just a few cents, they are now $5 to $6 a piece, and they're incredibly difficult to come by," the governor said. "They are also incredibly difficult to make in a sterile environment."

The governor also said they are working to identify and target 'hotspots' for testing, as well as testing capacity and turnaround.
 


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