Arizona history-April 17-23

Sunday, April 17

On this date in 1911, Sarah Bernhardt performed at the Tucson Opera House.

On this date in 1894, the business district of Jerome, then the largest mining camp in Arizona, was completely destroyed by fire.

On this date in 1913, an air blast, generated by the fall of 3 million tons of capping in the Miami mine, killed seven miners. The blast blew ore cars up to 100 feet (30.5 meters) .

On this date in 1930, 17 stills, 2000 gallons (7,571 liters) of mash and 40 gallons (151.42 liters) of whiskey were confiscated by Greenlee County officers.

On this date in 1931, a government order was issued for the extinction of the wild horse herds in the Coconino National Forest.

Monday, April 18

On this date in 1924, the Chiricahua National Monument was established.

On this date in 1924, 1,600 motorists were stranded at points of entrance to Arizona because of the embargo on all vehicular traffic due to a hoof and mouth quarantine. The occupants of 115 cars at Needles threatened to overpower Arizona border guards, and the governor ordered the National Guard readied for duty.

On this date in 1931, construction began on an Army Airways Operations Building at Fly Field in Yuma.

Tuesday, April 19

On this date in 1859, Fort Mojave was established.

On this date in 1884, Henry Chee Dodge was appointed head Chief of the Navajo Tribe by Agent Riordan.

Wednesday, April 20

On this date in 1825, Charles Poston, “Father of Arizona,” was born.

On this date in 1877, the town of Globe was founded.

On this date in 1920, a gasoline shortage forced many stations to close.

On this date in 1927, the town of Globe celebrated its 50th anniversary with 50,000 people, including Gov. George W.P. Hunt who had first entered Globe in 1881, riding a mule and seeking his fortune.

On this date in 1931, funeral services were held for Mrs. Helen Duett Hunt, wife of Arizona Gov. George W.P. Hunt.

Thursday, April 21

On this date in 1877, John Clum, with Clay Beauford and his Apache Police Force, arrested Geronimo and 13 other Apache renegades at Ojo Caliente, New Mexico.

On this date in 1904, Edward Tewksbury, the last survivor of the Graham-Tewksbury feud, died.

On this date in 1917, an agricultural conference meeting at the University of Arizona was startled when Dr. A.E. Vinson recommended slaughtering 25,000 wild burros and grinding the meat to make bologna.

On this date in 1928, Maricopa and Pima counties battled over their boundaries before the State Supreme Court.

Friday, April 22

On this date in 1919, the government opened its case in the Phoenix trial of two Cocopah Indians charged with the killing of their tribal medicine man who failed to halt a flu bug.

On this date in 1919, contracts were signed by Pima and Pinal County authorities and the U.S. Forest Service for the construction of a road from Oracle to Soldier’s Camp in the Catalina Mountains.

On this date in 1920, prominent society and club women started a boycott on potatoes to protest the price. Housewives in Phoenix were called and asked to support the boycott and tell five friends to do the same.

On this date in 1938, the head of the Maricopa County Highway Safety squad was tried in Tempe Justice Court on charges of reckless driving.

Saturday, April 23

On this date in 1850, Yuma Indians attacked the ferry at the Yuma Crossing. Fifteen people were killed and three reached safety on the west coast.

On this date in 1886, fire destroyed a block of business buildings in Phoenix. The town had no fire department or water works.

On this date in 1919, U.S. Marshals raided two underground stills located in an abandoned mining shaft near Jerome.

On this date in 1919, The Arizona Daily Star reported that tests and experiments were to be conducted for the first time concerning the use of airplanes to spot forest fires and transport firefighters.

On this date in 1983, Buster Crabbe, a former Olympic swimming gold medalist who went to star in movies such as “Tarzan the Fearless,” “Flash Gordon” and “Buck Rogers” in the 1930s and 1940s, died of a heart attack at his Scottsdale home at age 75.

On this date in 2010, Gov. Jan Brewer signs SB1070, a bill that requires local police officers to question people about their immigration status if there is reason to suspect they are illegal immigrants, into law.

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